Road Safety

Towards ZeroCouncil is committed to road safety and in collaboration with Transport for NSW runs programs and initiatives designed to address road safety at a local level. Road safety is everybody's responsibility

Council's Road Safety Programs aim to improve road user behaviour, improve the safety of the road and roadside environment, reduce the incidence and severity of casualties by promoting the use of safer vehicles and practices, develop community involvement and partnerships to achieve ownership of and effective participation in road safety, and support the strategic co-ordination and communication of road safety planning and action.

The Road Safety Programs are delivered in partnership with a number of other stakeholders and safety and traffic committees including:

  • New South Wales Police (Local Area Command)
  • New South Wales Health (Murrumbidgee Local Health District)
  • Department of Education and Training
  • Institute of Public Works Engineering Australia (IPWEA)
  • local hotels, clubs and pubs and the Liquor Accord
  • local primary and secondary schools
  • local community services and organisations

Council’s Road Safety Officer (RSO) is a key member of the broader Traffic & Transport Unit and the RSO is an important link between state government road safety policy and what happens in the Riverina. The role of the Road Safety Officer is primarily to develop and implement local road safety activities, with particular focus on behavioural change programs.

The Road Safety Officer, as part of the dedicated Traffic & Transport team at Wagga Wagga City Council, works tirelessly to develop programs to improve the level of safety and awareness on our roads. For more information you can contact the Road Safety Officer on (02) 6923 9544, or the Traffic Unit for general enquiries on (02) 6971 4670.

Safe Systems approach

SafeTo achieve the ultimate goal of zero deaths and serious injuries on NSW roads, we’ve adopted a safe system approach.

This approach is underpinned by these principles:

  • People are human and sometimes make mistakes – a simple mistake shouldn’t cost anyone their life.
  • Roads, roadsides and vehicles need to be designed to minimise crashes or reduce forces if a crash happens.
  • Road safety is a shared responsibility – everyone needs to make safe decisions on and around the road to prioritise safety.

Initiatives to ensure safer roads, speeds, people and cars need to be implemented together so the road system not only keeps us moving, but safe and protected.

Visit the Centre for Road Safety

Awareness Campaigns

To engage the community and help change unsafe behaviour on the roads, we develop education and awareness campaigns. These campaigns encourages and informs drivers to make good decisions. Each campaign gives an insight to human behaviour on the roads

Road safety information and resources

Behavioural factors in casualty crashes

In the Wagga LGA, speed, alcohol and fatigue are all significant casualty crash factors

Crash factors

Cars are the primary vehicle type involved in crashes where people are killed or injured, involved in 79% of casualty crashes.

Trucks are involved in 47% of casualty crashes across the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area (LGA). Over 26% of truck crashes involved light trucks. Around 21% of truck crashes involve articulated trucks (articulated tanker, semi-trailer, low loader, road train and B-double).

Motorcycles are involved in 9% of crashes

Vehicles

Gender and Age of Road User

Young people represent a significant number of vehicle controllers. Around 32% of all vehicle controllers across the Wagga Wagga Local Government area are young people aged between 17 – 25 years.

Other high risk groups are people aged 40 – 49 years, rand people aged 50 - 59 years.

Males represent around 67% of all controllers, with high risk groups mirroring those mentioned above.

Age group

Crashes by road classification

Over 69% of the casualty crashes occur on State Highways and other classified roads in the Wagga Wagga Local Government Area. Remaining crashes occur on local roads.

Residence of controller

For more information Road Safety NSW

General road safety information

Mobile phones Drivers of a vehicle must not use a hand-held mobile phone unless legally parked. You can be fined if the phone is in your hand including making or receiving phone calls, texting or using any other function of the phone. Drivers should avoid using a phone completely or use hands-free functions.
Seatbelts Seatbelts must be worn by all occupants in a vehicle. Seatbelts reduce the risk of injury and death in a crash significantly. The driver of the vehicle is also responsible to ensure all passengers are wearing a seatbelt.
Helmets Riders of motorcycles and bicycles must wear an approved helmet on their head.
Keep Left You must drive on the left side of two-way roads. Ask passengers to remind you each time you set off and when you are turning at an intersection – it could save your life.  
Stop sign This sign means you must STOP and give way to all vehicles. Stop your vehicle just before the white stop line painted on the road. If there is no line, stop where you have a clear view of approaching traffic and give way to vehicles approaching from your left and right. Only proceed if the roadway is clear. Stop sign
Give Way sign This sign means give way to all vehicles. You do not need to stop however should be able be have a clear, unobstructed view before proceeding. Give way sign
Speed The speed limit is the maximum driving speed allowed. You must not drive above this limit. Some roads and streets do not have a speed limit sign, but speed limits still apply. As a general rule, if there are houses or streetlights next to the road, the speed limit is 50km/h. If you are an open road or highway, the speed limit is a maximum of 100km/h. If the weather is poor (raining, fog, dawn) or on a narrow country road, make sure you drive slower.
Road Markings Where the centre line marking on the road is a single broken line, vehicles may cross the line to overtake when it is safe to do so. If the centre marking has two lines you must not overtake if the line closest to your vehicle is unbroken.
Alcohol and Drugs Driving after you’ve consumed alcohol or drugs affects your driving ability and is dangerous. You may be required by police to provide a sample of breath or saliva. The blood alcohol level is 0.05 per cent.
Driving Tired Avoid driving a vehicle when tired. Avoid driving after a long flight until you’ve adapted to sleeping normally at night. Share driving long distances with your friends. Take regular rest stops. Avoid driving too far in one day. Rest stops are located at regular intervals and should be used on long journeys. The only cure of being tired is having a sleep.  
Rural Roads Care should be taken when driving on country roads which can be narrow, unsealed, dusty and often in disrepair. Drive slowly and turn on your headlights even during the day. Do not drive through flooded roads. Watch out for animals such as kangaroos, emus and livestock. The most active time for many animals is sunrise and sunset. If an animal is on the road, reduce speed safely and do not swerve or you may lose control of the vehicle. Rural roads
Pedestrians Before you cross the road, Look out before you step out. Just because someone else decides to cross, doesn’t mean it’s safe for you. Always use pedestrian crossings or other pedestrian facilities where possible. Avoid crossing between parked cars or at the front or back of buses and large vehicles.

Tips for staying safe on our roads - Multicultural and Backpackers

  • By law you must wear a seatbelt in NSW. Seatbelts save lives
  • Drive to the speed limit
  • You must drive on the left-hand side. Ask passengers if you are unsure
  • Never drive while tired. Pull over and enjoy a rest area
  • Never use a mobile phone when driving. Distracted drivers cause crashes
  • Don’t drink alcohol if you are planning to drive
  • Don’t drink alcohol when driving
  • Allow plenty of room when passing or overtaking large trucks
  • Wide and long loads are common in NSW. Slow down and pull safely to the side of the road when you see the signs
  • Take care at rail crossings and look both ways for trains
  • Slow down when the road conditions or weather changes
  • Take extra care when overtaking. Do not cross double white lines
  • Always look out for wildlife and stock, which are common in NSW
  • Never drive through a flooded river or road.
  • Never drive towards or through smoke

Remember the Fatal Five

  • Speeding
  • Drink/Drug driving
  • Fatigue
  • Seatbelts
  • Distraction

Tips for safe school travel

Dropping off or picking up your children

Schools are areas where there is a lot of interaction between cars and pedestrians: your children. Children are small, hard to see, behave unpredictably, and are extremely vulnerable. Their lack of road experience means it is difficult for them to judge dangerous situations. Boys are twice as likely to be involved in pedestrian accidents as girls and children 10-14 years have the highest rate of child pedestrian casualties (Transport for NSW).

  • Children up to eight years old should hold an adult’s hand on the footpath, in the carpark or when crossing the road.
  • Children up to ten years old should be actively supervised around traffic and should hold an adult’s hand when crossing the road.
  • Take the time to make sure your children are aware of, understand and follow traffic safety regulations when they are walking.

Have a plan

Plan with your son or daughter how you will collect them. When and where will you be after school?  Where should they wait? Make sure they know not to try and get into your vehicle while it is still in traffic, even if you are stopped; they should wait until you have parked at the side of the road. Plan to arrive AFTER the school bell goes in the afternoon, so your children are ready and waiting for you and you are not blocking traffic.

No parking zones

A No Parking zone is a pickup and drop off area: you can stop here for a maximum of two minutes to drop off or pick up passengers and must remain within three metres of the vehicle. When parents park in a No Parking zone for longer than two minutes they prevent other parents from stopping to drop off or pick up their children, creating frustration and dangerous situations. If you arrive before the school bell and block the pickup areas, you risk a fine. Parking offences in school zones carry heavier fines and loss of demerit points. Wagga Wagga City Council makes no apologies for fining drivers who break the law around schools and in school zones.

Visit TFNSW website for more information about road rules and other road safety. https://www.rms.nsw.gov.au/roads/safety-rules/road-rules/index.html

Tips for staying safe on our roads - Multicultural and Backpackers

  • By law you must wear a seatbelt in NSW. Seatbelts save lives
  • Drive to the speed limit
  • You must drive on the left-hand side. Ask passengers if you are unsure
  • Never drive while tired. Pull over and enjoy a rest area
  • Never use a mobile phone when driving. Distracted drivers cause crashes
  • Don’t drink alcohol if you are planning to drive
  • Don’t drink alcohol when driving
  • Allow plenty of room when passing or overtaking large trucks
  • Wide and long loads are common in NSW. Slow down and pull safely to the side of the road when you see the signs
  • Take care at rail crossings and look both ways for trains
  • Slow down when the road conditions or weather changes
  • Take extra care when overtaking. Do not cross double white lines
  • Always look out for wildlife and stock, which are common in NSW
  • Never drive through a flooded river or road.
  • Never drive towards or through smoke

Remember the Fatal Five

  • Speeding
  • Drink/Drug driving
  • Fatigue
  • Seatbelts
  • Distraction

Tips for staying safe on our roads - Fatigue

    Driver fatigue is one of the three big killers on NSW roads.

    Fatigue-related crashes can happen on any trip no matter how long or short or what time of day. It’s important to think about how tired you are before driving, recognise the early warning signs when driving and know what to do to avoid driving tired.

    Take the test before getting on the road: testyourtiredself.com.au

    The best way to prevent driver fatigue is to make sure you have enough sleep before driving, regardless of the length of your trip. Remember, sleep is the only cure for tiredness.

    Below are some tips on avoiding fatigue-related accidents:

  • Get a good night's sleep before commencing a long trip.
  • Do not drive at times when you would normally be asleep.
  • Avoid long drives after work.
  • Take regular breaks from driving (use rest areas).
  • Share the driving whenever possible.
  • Pull over and stop when drowsiness, discomfort or loss of concentration occurs.
  • Find out whether any medicine you are taking may affect your driving.
  • If you feel tired when driving:

  • Pull over for a break in a safe place.
  • Pull over for a nap (20 minutes works best).
  • Swap drivers if you can.
  • Stop for a coffee if you’re on a short drive, although the effects of caffeine won't help for long and won't work for everyone.
  • Even if you don’t feel tired, take regular breaks to avoid becoming tired.
  • Recognise the early warning signs of fatigue:

  • Yawning
  • Poor concentration
  • Tired eyes
  • Restlessness
  • Drowsiness
  • Slow reactions
  • Boredom
  • Oversteering